The “Kentucky Bend” or the “New Madrid Bend” is a geographic anomaly that is confusing about where it came from. The Exclave used to be attached to Kentucky prior to 1812. However, a series of earthquakes known as the New Madrid Earthquakes were happening from 1811-1812 and some were nearly 8.0’s on the Richter Scale. These earthquakes changed the course of the Mississippi River to drift south and by the end of them, Kentucky lost some land to Missouri, including a connection from the bend to the mainland. Even though this land only houses around a dozen people and covers an area of only 27 square miles, Tennessee wouldn’t relinquish its claim. They believed since it was on their side it was automatically their own and kept their claim until 1848 when they gave it up. The Civil War brought tensions between the Union and the Confederacy both claiming the Kentucky Bend once again. The Battle of Island Number Ten was held from February 28-April 28, 1862 ending up in the Union’s victory. You cannot visit Island Number Ten however due to it being eroded away. Island Number Eight and Nine still remain though.

The Jordans

The Jordans

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